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BroadwayUniversity.com Real Audio

Spring 1999 Producing Theatre TeleCourses are taped and converted to the Real Audio format. You can listen, using your web browser, the Real Player plug-in, and your 28.8kbs or faster modem, to the TeleCourse. Perfect if you miss a class or want to listen again to a previous class.

Instructions:

  1. If you have not already dones so, tap on the RealAudio Icon to download the FREE Real Player program. This will place Real Player files on your hard drive.
  2. Tap on the TeleCourse that you wish to listen to below. If you are asked to identify a helper application, please identify the Real Player application as the helper application for listening. The lecture should begin to play very soon after you tap on the TeleCourse icon.
  3. Bookmark this page to return to check our growing list of RealAudio TeleCourses.

10-Week Course on Producing Theatre

Additional Available Real Audio Courses

As an example, under the off-Broadway collective bargaining agreement with the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers, 60% of the Weekly Operating Profits of an off-Broadway show are returned to the producers and investors, and the remaining 40% is split amongst the participants in the pool pro-rata. Under a standard royalty agreement, the playwright might get 5% of the GWBOR , the director 2%, and the producer 3%, for a total of 10% of the GWBOR . Under this royalty pool arrangement, the playwright would get 5/10ths, the director 2/10ths, and the producer 3/10ths of 40% of the Weekly Operating Profits . To minimize the risk for the royalty pool participants, all the participants are guaranteed a minimum royalty payment each week even if there are no Weekly Operating Profits to share. Click here for more information regarding the corresponding TeleCourse.

Whether they are selling tickets to the hot new Broadway musical or a play in a 99-seat theatre in Grand Rapids, the right telemarketers can be"personal shoppers" for their clients, letting them know when something they' ll love is about to come in. Click here for more information regarding the corresponding TeleCourse.

A marketing firm, Randall explains, plays a different role than an advertising agency or a press agent. Once affiliated with a show, Pro Marketing develops and implements promotions, special events and contests that raise the visibility of the show, while at the same time keeping costs down by arranging trades for tickets rather than paying for the promotion. Aside from a retainer paid to the marketing firm and the tickets given away, the cost to the producer is minimal. Click here for more information regarding the corresponding TeleCourse.

The first in a new series of TeleCourses entitled "War Stories", in which experienced producers share their stories of success and failure, joy and heartbreak with the participants. I believe that hearing these "War Stories" can give us insight into the process of producing a show, and can also allow us to learn from another producer's experience as we develop our own projects. Our first "War Stories" guest is producer Bill Repecci, who told us how one of the most successful small musical revues of recent years, "Swingtime Canteen", came to be. A hit off-Broadway in 1994, "Swingtime Canteen" is even more popular across the country. Click here for more information regarding the corresponding TeleCourse.

What exactly is a sponsorship? It is a situation wherein a company "ties in" with a show. Usually the show wants money, and in exchange for it, provides the company with some kind of exposure. Every sponsorship deal is different. There could be an upfront fee for the run of the show, or a weekly fee, or both. The producer could put the brand name over the show's title, as Tom did with Hallmark and "The Sound of Music"; or on the name of a new theater, as Livent's "Ragtime" at the new Ford Center for the Performing Arts; or on the title page of the program and tagged in all of the show's ads, for example Dannon with Madison Square Garden's "A Christmas Carol". The company might underwrite part of the show's advertising budget, if its name and logo are to be included in the ads, or provide merchandise and high-profile audition space (as Macy\rquote s did with the recent Broadway production of "Annie". The show might provide the company with complimentary tickets to be given as employee incentives or as contest prizes, or discount tickets, backstage tours, walk-on roles, perhaps even product placement in the show (as the Broadway musical "Big" did for the famous toy store F.A.O. Schwartz). In most cases, the sponsors will probably not wish to invest in the show (where they would anticipate - or perhaps gamble - a return on their money). Instead, they would provide sponsorship fees in exchange for their brand's exposure to the show's captive audience and for the goodwill their brand name would receive by being associated with a quality show. Click here for more information regarding the corresponding TeleCourse.

We spoke with Marcia from inside the box-office of "The Diary of Anne Frank" at the Music Box Theatre.. The company manager has, as Marcia put it, her hand in every part of the pie. The company manager's critical relationships with the producers, general manager, accountant, box office treasurer, cast, and house staff keep the day-to-day operation of the show running smoothly as she works as the producer's representative and a true liaison between all of the above key players. Click here for more information regarding the corresponding TeleCourse.

We felt a TeleCourse on this subject was very important because in our experience, many producers do not adequately "think out" their insurance needs. Some spend too much money and overinsure their productions, buying every policy available because they have not taken the time to consider the specific needs of their productions and what policies may not be necessary . Others underinsure their productions, thinking only about the money they are spending and not giving enough thought to the possibility of the unexpected. Robert outlines the different kinds of insurance policies available to theatrical producers, and explained what they cover and when they may apply.Click here for more information regarding the corresponding TeleCourse.

BroadwayUniversity.com Audiotape Sets on Cassettes. -

The growing catalog of audiotapes of our TeleCourses and live programs will also be available on cassette soon.

Instructions: Watch for the availability announcement, in Broadway University News.

For more information contact Editor@BroadwayUniversity.com

 

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