================================================
Broadway University News for Thursday June 24, 1999
******************CIRCULATON 4,973******************
=================================================

COMING SOON: BROADWAY UNIVERSITY E-MAIL DISCUSSION LIST.

The purpose of this FREE discussion group is to discuss networking, mentoring and business building opportunities pertaining to producing, financing and marketing theatrical events.

WATCH FOR ANNOUNCEMENT ON HOW TO SIGN UP!

===================================================
IN THIS ISSUE:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

***WHAT'S THE BUZZ? -
REMINDER: TRU presents:
Marketing and Promoting Your Upcoming Season or Production
TONIGHT Thursday, June 24, 7:30 PM

***GOOD READING-This week's featured books:
VISIT BROADWAY UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE AT
http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/books.html

This week's featured book:
JOE PAPP: An American Life by Helen Epstein.
TO ORDER CLICK: http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/books.html (PRODUCING)

***FREE via RealAudio. Listen to past TeleCourses at
http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/real.html
(See below for instructions)

***PRODUCERS CORNER #18
Be A Nice Boss - Give Your Show A Promotion
=====================================================

*** WHAT'S THE BUZZ? ***

REMINDER:
THEATER RESOURCES UNLIMITED and
PERFORMING ARTS RESOURCES present
Marketing and Promoting Your Upcoming Season or Production
TONIGHT Thursday, June 24, 7:30 PM
Blue Heron Arts Center, 123 E. 24th Street
Michael Hartman, publicist;
Wai Look, Business Volunteers for the Arts, Arts & Business Council; Evan Shapiro, marketing consultant, Fourfront Marketing.

Developing an effective marketing strategy, and the basics you can't do without ... coordinating your marketing efforts, and the importance of timing... secrets of a successful business plan ... press releases: how and when to write and send them.

Free to current members of PAR & TRU. $7.00 to non-members. Not yet a member? Join at the door and enter free! Not sure? Apply entry cost to membership that night!
7:30 PM refreshments & schmooze, 8:00 PM panel.
RSVP (so we can plan food & chairs!)

TRU: 212-714-7628
PAR: 212-673-6343; DBradyPAR@aol.com

=============================================================
***GOOD READING***
***GOOD READING***
VISIT BROADWAY UNIVERSITY BOOKSOTRE at
http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/books.html

This week's featured book:
JOE PAPP: An American Life by Helen Epstein.

This first biography of the late Joseph Papp will be a hard act to follow. Epstein, who collaborated with Papp on an earlier attempt to tell the theatrical impresario's story, had access to Papp's papers, his family, friends, enemies, and business associates. A man of many contradictions, one who invented and reinvented himself, Papp was a tough kid from Brooklyn. His street-learned business sense would enable him to sift the gold from the glitter of Michael Bennett's A Chorus Line, and his early exposure to Hamlet would lead to the founding of the New York Shakespeare Festival. Epstein recounts these and other triumphs in detail, providing fascinating background on the plays, the theaters, the actors and directors, the political battles, the hits and misses. She also does a remarkably balanced job of describing Papp's not-so-nice private life, his wives and lovers, and his difficult relationships with his children. Was Papp a prodigiously creative cultural entrepreneur . . . a contemporary Robin Hood who stole art from the rich and gave it to the poor, or was he, as critic John Simon argues, a man with vulgar . . . notions of what culture is? Epstein manages to show that he was all of the above. And more.

To order CLICK: http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/books.html (PRODUCING). Transactions secured through Amazon.com the Earth's Largest Bookstore.

=============================================================
*** FREE via RealAudio, you may listen to select one-hour Broadway University TeleCourses on various subjects relating to producing and marketing theatre. Go to http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/real.html

Take 10 minutes to perform the easy and free download of RealPlayer. After installing this software, simply click on the title you wish to hear and RealPlayer will automatically open and begin playing the TeleCourse over your computer speakers.

TeleCourse guest speakers include: Patrick Herold (Literary Agent), James Freydberg (Producing With Passion), Rodger Hess (Raising Money), Roger Gindi (Royalty Pools), Fred Schnitzer (Telemarketing), Randall Wreghitt (Marketing), Bill Repicci (Producing), Tom Viertel (Sponsorship), Marcia Goldberg (Company Manager), Robert Boyar (Theatrical Insurance), Albert Poland (Theatre Licenses) and George Wachtel (Surveys and Demographics), Christopher Gould (Play Licensing), Evan Shapiro (Marketing), Robert Boyar (Theatrical Insurance), Dana Singer (Securing Underlying Rights), Jean Ward, Esq. (Negotiating Author Agreements).

*Currently enrolled Broadway University students may listen to additional RealAudio TeleCourses and review this semester's past lectures at the Student Access Only page (Password required). ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
***PRODUCERS CORNER #18
Be A Nice Boss -
Give Your Show A Promotion

Recently our guest was Broadway marketing maven Margery Singer, who has worked on the promotional campaigns for the recent Broadway productions of Footloose, High Society, 1776, Titanic, The Secret Garden, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, Once Upon a Mattress and The King and I. Margery discussed advanced promotional campaigns for commercial theatre, and why she plans a promotional campaign without waiting for good reviews that may not happen.

The marketing of a show, Margery explained, consists of, among other things: advertising, which the producer controls and pays for through the advertising agency; public relations, which consists of the reviews, feature stories, interviews, listings and other "free publicity" coordinated by the press agent; group sales, solicited and sold by a specially hired group sales expert; and promotions, which is her area of expertise. In other words, she explained, marketing is anything that reminds people that you are performing and puts them in your seats.

Margery usually begins her association with a production about 6 months before the first performance. At this point, she and the producer and other key players discuss the marketing plan for the show. They determine what elements of the show are going to sell tickets, keeping in mind that there is never any guarantee that any show will get good reviews, and therefore they have to be armed with an "arsenal" of marketing plans well before the reviews are in print. There may be a star in the leading role, or the show itself may be the attraction, as in the case of The Lion King and Titanic. Next, Margery and the producers may work with the advertising agency to do a "focus group." An outside expert comes in and asks a specially chosen group of approximately 20 people who have something in common - this is the "focus group" - specific questions relating to the show they have planned. These people, for example, may be 20 single working women between the ages of 30 and 40, or 20 married women between the ages of 30 and 40 who stay at home with their children. Margery and others watch the reactions of the focus group from behind a one-way mirror, and the answers and reactions are later analyzed to help the production plan its marketing campaign. It was through a focus group that Margery discovered that people associate Footloose not with Kevin Bacon or the movie but with the music. Armed with this knowledge, she and her team will spend 80% of their marketing budget on radio advertising and promotion.

Margery has developed relationships with approximately 30 major corporations who she will then approach with promotional ideas. For example, she has often worked with A&P grocery stores. She will develop an idea for a sweepstakes or other kind of contest with them, and the name of her show will then appear in A&P's advertising for the contest, at A&P's cost. The production will donate tickets as prizes in exchange. Customers will have to enter the contest at an A&P, which brings people into A&P's stores and at the same time keeps A&P shoppers and others who see the A&P ads aware of her show. Other promotional ideas might include direct mailings (discussed in a previous Producer's Corner); in-store cast appearances at a department store, perhaps in conjunction with an in-store sweepstakes; the offer of priority tickets (the best seats in the house, offered before they go on sale to the general public) or discount tickets to the customers of the promotional partner; or a 3-way promotional tie-in, such as when Matthew Broderick opened a new Citibank while How to Succeed was on Broadway, and Time Warner Cable co-sponsored and advertised the event. For a drama with a serious theme, such as The Diary of Anne Frank, she would work with bookstores on promotional ideas, and also work with the institutions in New York that coordinate educational outreach programs for Broadway shows, such as events for students and study guides.

This relationship began fortuitously when A&P took over the Times Square billboard that housed a Guys & Dolls ad when that show was running on Broadway a few years ago. A&P wanted to use the billboard to advertise its 8:00 Coffee, and How to Succeed featured a song called "Coffee Break." Margery made the connection and negotiated a promotional arrangement that involved getting the show's name on the billboard in exchange for showing the 8:00 Coffee logo on the blimp that is featured in the show. Normally, Margery does not offer her promotional partners such actual product placement in a show, but in this situation the "signage" did not compromise the artistic integrity of the show. The King and I was featured on the billboard, and now her current Broadway project, High Society, is featured.

In addition to discussing ideas with her usual promotional partners, Margery approaches new potential partners for each show she promotes. She explained that she looks at the New York Times every day and scours magazines to determine what companies are spending the most advertising dollars, because those are the companies that will be amenable to including her show in their advertising when they develop a cross-promotional campaign, and they are the companies that will give her show the most exposure. Then, she discerns what products might be a good match for her new show. For example, she will be approaching sneaker companies for promotional tie-ins for Footloose, and for Once Upon a Mattress she developed a promotion with Dial-A-Mattress.

As mentioned above, if the reviews for a show are mixed or negative, the affect they have on the box office can be minimized by a preplanned marketing campaign. By the time the reviews for High Society came out, which were mixed with a negative review in the New York Times, Margery had already set up a High Society contest with People magazine and Time Warner Cable wherein the winner will win a luxurious vacation in Paris. High Society will thus be prominently featured in People and on a cable commercial without paying a penny in advertising fees. Margery also arranged to have the display windows at Saks Fifth Avenue dressed as a High Society promotion. Priceless!

Margery recommends being both persistent and discriminating in setting up your promotional campaign. 6 to 8 weeks before you would like to hold a promotional event or contest with a promotional partner, call that company and make sure you find out who the correct person is to approach about a promotional idea. Either call that person right away or send them a letter regarding your idea, and follow the letter up with a phone call. Also, limit your efforts to finding promotional partners whose customers have something in common with your potential audience, and who you know spend advertising dollars. Margery has already decided that she is going to choose only one promotional partner to offer discount tickets to Footloose, so she can offer valuable exclusivity to that partner. She is also going to focus on radio promotion for that show, so the New Yorkers who listen to popular radio on their way to work and on their way home know they can hear the songs they love from Footloose live on stage.

When you are setting up your promotional campaign for your show and getting ready to approach potential partners, Margery suggested, ask yourself what the objectives are of those potential partners, so you can structure your ideas around their objectives. Supermarkets and department stores want people to come into their stores, soft drinks and snacks companies want people to sample their products, and radio stations want listeners who will not stray across the dial. Your objective is to sell tickets and get people to start talking about your show.

That’s show biz

=======================================

Bruce J. Lazarus, Editor of Broadway University News, is an entertainment attorney in New York City providing counsel in business transactions and finance for the theatre, film, and music industries. He is the former Director of Business and Legal Affairs for Walt Disney Motion Pictures and Television, Inc. and Walt Disney Theatrical Productions Ltd., responsible for KING DAVID, THE LION KING, AIDA and the international companies of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. He recently produced the off-Broadway play SHAKESPEARE'S R&J (Winner 1998 Lucile Lortel Award) and the feature film "INTERRUPTIONS," which is currently on the festival circuit.

For a FREE consultation regarding legal representation Bruce Lazarus can be reached by telephone at 212.333.7000 (ext. 15), by FAX at 212.208.3059 or by e-mail at Bruce@BroadwayUniversity.com.

=======================================================

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Editor: Bruce Lazarus
Email: Editor@BroadwayUniversity.com
Mail: 1776 Broadway, Eleventh Floor, New York, NY 10019
Phone: 212.333.7000 (ext. 15)
Fax: 212.208.3059

(c) Copyright EntertainmentU, Inc.
Broadway University News may only be redistributed in its unedited form. Written permission must be obtained to reprint or cite the information contained within this newsletter.

================================================
Broadway University News for Thursday June 17, 1999
******************CIRCULATON 4,939******************
=================================================

COMING SOON: BROADWAY UNIVERSITY E-MAIL DISCUSSION LIST.
The purpose of this FREE discussion group is to discuss networking, mentoring and business building opportunities pertaining to producing, financing and marketing theatrical events.
WATCH FOR ANNOUNCEMENT ON HOW TO SIGN UP!

===================================================
IN THIS ISSUE: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

***WHAT'S THE BUZZ? -
TRU presents:
Marketing and Promoting Your Upcoming Season or Production
Thursday, June 24, 7:30 PM

**GOOD READING - this week's featured book:
Stage Writers Handbook: A Complete Business Guide for Playwrights, Composers, Lyricists and Librettists by Dana Singer.
TO ORDER CLICK:http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/books.html (WHAT'S HOT)

* FREE via RealAudio listen to past TeleCourses at
http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/real.html
(See below for instructions)

* ** PRODUCERS CORNER #16
The Role of the General Manager, Part I
A Tale of Two Budgets

=====================================================
*** WHAT'S THE BUZZ? ***
THEATER RESOURCES UNLIMITED and
PERFORMING ARTS RESOURCES present

Marketing and Promoting Your Upcoming Season or Production
Thursday, June 24, 7:30 PM
Blue Heron Arts Center, 123 E. 24th Street

Michael Hartman, publicist,;
Wai Look, Business Volunteers for the Arts, Arts & Business Council;
Evan Shapiro, marketing consultant, Fourfront Marketing.

Developing an effective marketing strategy, and the basics you can't do without ... coordinating your marketing efforts, and the importance of timing... secrets of a successful business plan ... press releases: how & when to write & send them.

Free to current members of PAR & TRU. $7.00 to non-members. Not yet a member? Join at the door and enter free!
Not sure? Apply entry cost to membership that night!
7:30 PM refreshments & schmooze, 8:00 PM panel.
RSVP (so we can plan food & chairs!)

TRU: 212-714-7628
PAR: 212-673-6343; http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/books.html

This week's featured book:
Stage Writers Handbook: A Complete Business Guide for Playwrights, Composers, Lyricists and Librettists by Dana Singer.
Published by Theatre Communications Group

A left-brained book for right-brained people. Or maybe it's the other way around. Subtitled "A Complete Business Guide for Playwrights, Composers, Lyricists, and Librettists," the book sets out clearly and straightforwardly what to expect, what your responsibilities are, what your rights are, how much to charge for your services and how to protect yourself as a professional theater writer today. It's all here: copyrights, agents, contracts, script approval, credits, royalties... all the stuff that could make you--or break you.

Written in a straightforward manner, with complicated matters clearly explained, Stage Writers Handbook is truly a work no writer for the stage can afford to be without. Here, for the first time, Dana Singer gathers the information and ideas stage writers need to conduct their careers in a businesslike manner, with all the protections the law provides.

To order CLICK: http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/books.html (WHAT'S HOT). Transactions secured through Amazon.Com the Earth's Largest Bookstore.

================================================================
*** FREE via RealAudio, you may listen to select one-hour Broadway University TeleCourses on various subjects relating to producing and marketing theatre. Go to http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/real.html.

Take 10 minutes to perform the easy and free download of RealPlayer. After installing this software, simply click on the title you wish to hear and RealPlayer will automatically open and begin playing the TeleCourse over your computer speakers.

TeleCourse guest speakers include: Patrick Herold (Literary Agent), James Freydberg (Producing With Passion), Rodger Hess (Raising Money), Roger Gindi (Royalty Pools), Fred Schnitzer (Telemarketing), Randall Wreghitt (Marketing), Bill Repicci (Producing), Tom Viertel (Sponsorship), Marcia Goldberg (Company Manager), Robert Boyar (Theatrical Insurance), Albert Poland (Theatre Licenses) and George Wachtel (Surveys and Demographics), Christopher Gould (Play Licensing), Evan Shapiro (Marketing), Robert Boyar (Theatrical Insurance), Dana Singer (Securing Underlying Rights), Jean Ward, Esq. (Negotiating Author Agreements).

*Currently enrolled Broadway University students may listen to additional RealAudio TeleCourses and review this semester's past lectures at the Student Access Only page (Password required).

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
***PRODUCERS' CORNER #16
The Role of the General Manager, Part I
A Tale of Two Budgets

Recently our guest was Roger Gindi, my partner producer on the current off-Broadway play Shakespeare's R&J. Roger was also general manager of Our Country's Good and A Small Family Business on Broadway, and Nunsense, Nunsense Jamboree and David Mamet's Oleanna off-Broadway, among many other shows. Roger spoke to the TeleCourse about production budgets, and the role the general manager plays in developing and implementing those budgets. A subsequent article will discuss the difference between budgets for Broadway, off-Broadway, and Broadway Alliance productions.

Roger's first piece of advice to producers is to find a general manager for your production before you do anything else. This is vital to setting up your production for success, for reasons that will become apparent later on in this discussion. As a general manager (commonly referred to as a “GM”), the first thing Roger does is develop budgets for the production. He has had many producers come to him requesting that he devise budgets for their productions after they have already obtained the rights to the play they want to produce. This may be a big mistake, he warned. You cannot know what royalty arrangement to offer authors until after you have worked out your budget and “run the numbers,” before you know what royalty arrangements will be realistic.

It is a good idea to meet with your general manager early on. He or she will request a production fee for work from that first meeting through rehearsal and up to your first performance. Once performances get underway, your general manager will be paid a weekly salary. The general manager will probably also request that you commit to using him or her as the general manager of all companies of your show that you produce.

Roger noted that the first thing he does is find out how much money the producer has a realistic expectation of raising. Then, he looks at the play's requirements for sets, costumes, cast and crew; what size theater would be best suited for the production; what the advertising and marketing campaign might cost; and what union contracts or royalty agreements need to be taken into consideration.

Next, your general manager will draw up your budgets, always looking to maximize profits by minimizing the expense of the production.

The general manager will draw up two budgets. One, the Production Budget, will cover everything that a production will need to get it to a half an hour before the first performance. This will include rehearsal salaries, general manager and legal fees; royalty advances to authors; fees and advances to directors; rent for rehearsal space; deposits on the theatre; the cost of building sets and costumes; renting lighting and sound equipment; an operating reserve fund for those first, often slow weeks (usually 4 weeks for an off-Broadway show); and advance advertising and marketing costs. The Production Budget will also have some money earmarked to offset advertising costs for the first weeks that the show is actually running. Under Association of Theatrical Press Agents and Managers (“ATPAM”) requirements, the press agent begins to collect his or her salary 4 weeks before rehearsals begin, but especially in the case of a highly anticipated production, and with magazines running on a 3 month “lead time,” it is often critical that a press agent begin disseminating press releases, photos and story ideas months ahead of time. Therefore, some money may be put into the Production Budget for advance payments to the press agent.

The second budget the GM will draw up is known as the Weekly Operating Budget. This budget breaks down what it will cost the show to run on a weekly basis once performances begin, thus setting the “break even” point that producers look to when they analyze the Gross Weekly Box Office Receipts (referred to as the “GWBOR”). It includes weekly salaries; theatre rent; royalties; fees to the general manager, company manager, press agent and lawyer; weekly advertising and marketing; and anything else that needs to be paid every performance week. As a general rule, Roger told us, your operating budget off-Broadway should be no more than the amount of money the box office would take in if it sold 50% of the house every night that week at full price. On Broadway, the aim is a little lower, perhaps 40%, primarily because the theater capacity is larger.

In addition to doing the initial budgets, the general manager is the producer's financial advisor and consultant. Some producers wish to involve themselves heavily in the every day business of their productions, some do not. The general manager is sometimes the producer by default, often taking on many diverse responsibilities as the production goes on. He or she is a one-stop financial person as well, the person to check in with regularly to discuss the financial status and health of your production. Your general manager may tell you that you cannot afford the new advertising campaign you just thought of, the turntable you want on your set, or the star you want in the leading role, or when it's time to close the show before you give back all the net profits you have just made.

That's show biz.
=======================================

Bruce J. Lazarus, Editor of Broadway University News, is an entertainment attorney in New York City providing counsel in business transactions and finance for the theatre, film, and music industries. He is the former Director of Business and Legal Affairs for Walt Disney Motion Pictures and Television, Inc. and Walt Disney Theatrical Productions Ltd., responsible for KING DAVID, THE LION KING, AIDA and the international companies of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. He recently produced the off-Broadway play SHAKESPEARE'S R&J (Winner 1998 Lucile Lortel Award) and the feature film "INTERUPTIONS," which is currently on the festival circuit.

For a FREE consultation regarding legal representation Bruce Lazarus can be reached by telephone: 212.333.7000 (ext. 15), FAX:212.208.3059 or by e- mail: Bruce@BroadwayUniversity.com

=======================================================
To subscribe to this broadcast, please email:
requests@lists.webvalence.com
subject: subscribe broadwayuniversity

To unsubscribe from this broadcast, please email:
requests@lists.webvalence.com
subject: unsubscribe broadwayuniversity

Comments and suggestions are welcomed and encouraged at
http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/bb.html

Broadway University FREE sample contracts and budgets. Use them at:
http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/freestuff.html

Editor: Bruce Lazarus
Email: Editor@BroadwayUniversity.com
Mail: 1776 Broadway, Eleventh Floor, New York, NY 10019
Phone: 212.333.7000 (ext. 15)
Fax: 212.208.3059

(c) Copyright EntertainmentU, Inc. Broadway University News may only be redistributed in its unedited form. Written permission must be obtained to reprint or cite the information contained within this newsletter.

================================================
Broadway University News for Wednesday June 9, 1999
******************CIRCULATON 4,891******************
=================================================

IN THIS ISSUE: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

***WHAT'S THE BUZZ? -
Backstage at the Tonys

**GOOD READING-This week's featured books:
This week's featured book:
STAGE DIRECTORS HANDBOOK (David Diamond, Terry Berliner, editors)

*** FREE via RealAudio listen to past TeleCourses at
http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/real.html
(See below for instructions)

* ** PRODUCERS CORNER #15
Negotiating Theatre Licenses - Part II


=====================================================
*** WHAT'S THE BUZZ? ***
Backstage at the Tonys
NEW YORK (Variety) - Quotes from backstage at the 53rd annual Tony Awards:

* Best actor in a play Brian Dennehy ("Death of a Salesman") held court with a champagne flute as a scepter and self-effacingly said that he "thought (Kevin) Spacey was gonna win."
      He added: "A year ago, (director) Bob Falls and I are on the phone .. and it turns into this."
      Dennehy said that after the play, members of the audience wait outside for the actors. "Fifty, 75, 100 people, they want to touch you because something has happened to them in the theater," he said. "It causes them to put their own lives on the stage, night after night. If that's not a true definition of art, I don't know what the hell is."

* Dame Judi Dench, winner for best actress in a play, was asked if she would do more Broadway after the limited run of "vAmy's View."
      "I've got to go home and clear it with the family. In 29 years of being married, I've never been away from my husband for this long," said Dench, who is wading through scripts since her Oscar win for "Shakespeare in Love."
      So, will "Amy's View" be heading to celluloid? "No, a thousand times no!" She quickly added: "I don't think you could film it. My instinct tells me it wouldn't be a good film."
      Dench lamented what was a bittersweet victory, given that "Amy's View" scripter David Hare was entirely overlooked for his three Broadway plays -- "The Blue Room," "Via Dolorosa" and "Amy's View." "Three sellout plays, too. I'm sad for David, for with this play especially, the more I do it, the more remarkable it has become (to me)," Dench said. * Kristin Chenoweth was surprised to win best featured actress in a musical for "You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown," but more surprised that she got changed from performing a song from the show in time to collect her Tony.
      "I was surprised (to win). We've all seen upsets," she said. As to her costume change, "I had five people changing me backstage. By the time I heard Gretha Boston's name, I was naked."

* Elizabeth Franz, best featured actress in a play for "Death of a Salesman," delicately side-stepped the question that finally emerged from a room full of reporters dying to ask it: So, is Linda Loman a starring role, or not? "Salesman's" producers were criticized for placing Franz in the featured category to avoid a collision with best actress winner Dame Judi Dench ("Amy's View").
      Said Franz, diplomatically: "I can't say. Stars support an ensemble of actors. I can't say 'She is this' or 'Biff is that.' It's show business, and my business is to do the show," Franz said. "Whatever they want to do with that, they can."

* Frank Wood seemed more animated than the stoic, befuddled jazz man and father he plays in Warren Leight's "Side Man" after receiving the award for best featured actor in a play.
      "I've been fantasizing about a Tony for a long time," he enthused. How will it affect the longevity of the play, which is losing $50,000 a week? "I don't know the relative power of awards. People tell me it has to win best play." It later did.

* Despite nabbing the honor for best director of a play ("Death of a Salesman"), Robert Falls, also Chicago's Goodman Theater artistic director, blasted Broadway commercial producers for short-circuiting new American work with their "lack of courage" to put new American writing onstage.
      "They are under great economic pressure of course," said Falls, who said the surprise with reviving what was once a new American work -- "Salesman" -- was digging into it and seeing the audience finding it fresh every night.

* Receiving a lifetime achievement Tony, Uta Hagen, who can be seen this season Off Broadway in "Collected Stories," took a shot a Hollywooders who commit only to short stints in live theater. Even as fans in the crowd shouted at the top of their lungs for Kevin Spacey and Brian Dennehy, who are playing in such limited engagements, Hagan observed: "Everybody says they love the theater, they want to do theater, but they don't mean it. They make their money in Hollywood, then do us the favor of playing for 12 weeks, or a few more. That's not serving the theater."

* Matthew Bourne, who took home best choreography and best director of a musical honors for "Swan Lake," lamented that he is having a difficult time raising cash for a Broadway run of his newest production, "Cinderella," though that might change with the two Tony Awards. "Financially it is looking to be a problem. It's a very expensive show, and right now the sums aren't adding up," Bourne said.

* Having visited 30 prisons in Tennessee and Atlanta to come up with the dark nightmarish designs for "Not About Nightingales" that brought him best scenic design honors, Richard Hoover commented: "It turns out that there are a lot of prisons. I don't have a fetish. It was a painful journey of discovery."

* The team from best musical "Fosse" emerged from their revelry long enough to take a few questions. Said co-creator Gwen Verdon, "It was a mess till we got (Livent creative chief) Todd Haimes. With him, we could finally breathe instead of panting. And Roy Furman really bailed us out and kept us from folding."
      Garth Drabinsky, the man who started both Livent and "Fosse," isn't even in the country, of course, due to his indictments on 16 counts of securities fraud. Marty Bell, former Livent creative director, said simply, "Garth was very involved in this, and we miss him tonight."

* "I was very, very surprised," said Warren Leight, author of best play "Side Man." "Of course, the year I'm nominated, they nominate a Tennessee Williams play."

* It was a bull's eye for Barry and Fran Weissler, producers of "Annie Get Your Gun," winner of best revival of a musical. "Everyone called to say, 'We really love you, but you're not gonna win.' So we really were surprised," Fran Weissler said.
      But, Barry quashed the rumor that Dolly Parton would be joining the cast of "Annie." "She has no interest in doing a Broadway musical, but we're talking to her about other things," he said. ======================================================================
***GOOD READING***
VISIT BROADWAY UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE at
http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/books.html

This week's featured book:

STAGE DIRECTORS HANDBOOK (David Diamond, Terry Berliner, editors; Theatre Communications Group, $18.95) is the first comprehensive guide for theatre directors and choreographers. Information is pertinent to all career levels. Subjects covered include: training programs, grants and fellowships, service organizations, agents, regional theatres, working abroad, producing your own work and opportunities in new media. Prominent artists in the field contribute first-hand accounts and give advice.

Volume was prepared by Stage Directors and Choreographers Foundation. It can be ordered from TCG, (212) 697-5320, or purchased at The Drama Bookshop, Barnes and Noble, amazon.com and other outlets.
================================================================

*** FREE via RealAudio, you may listen to select one-hour Broadway University TeleCourses on various subjects relating to producing and marketing theatre. Go to http://www.BroadwayUniversity.com/real.html.

Take 10 minutes to perform the easy and free download of RealPlayer. After installing this software, simply click on the title you wish to hear and RealPlayer will automatically open and begin playing the TeleCourse over your computer speakers.

TeleCourse guest speakers include: Patrick Herold (Literary Agent), James Freydberg (Producing With Passion), Rodger Hess (Raising Money), Roger Gindi (Royalty Pools), Fred Schnitzer (Telemarketing), Randall Wreghitt (Marketing), Bill Repicci (Producing), Tom Viertel (Sponsorship), Marcia Goldberg (Company Manager), Robert Boyar (Theatrical Insurance), Albert Poland (Theatre Licenses) and George Wachtel (Surveys and Demographics), Christopher Gould (Play Licensing), Evan Shapiro (Marketing), Robert Boyar (Theatrical Insurance), Dana Singer (Securing Underlying Rights), Jean Ward, Esq. (Negotiating Author Agreements). *Currently enrolled Broadway University students may listen to additional RealAudio TeleCourses and review this semester's past lectures at the Student Access Only page (Password required).

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***PRODUCERS CORNER #15
Negotiating Theatre Licenses - Part II

Recently, our guest was Albert Poland, General Manager of Wait Until Dark starring Marisa Tomei and Quentin Tarantino and last year's Tony Award-winning Best Play The Last Night of Ballyhoo on Broadway, and Marc Salem's Mindgames off-Broadway. Albert's additional general managing credits include Little Shop of Horrors, Steel Magnolias, Only Kidding, Steve Martin's Picasso at the Lapin Agile and Sam Shepard's A Lie of the Mind. In addition to discussing negotiating a theatre license, which I discussed in a previous "Producer's Corner," Albert talked about how a general manager's diligence in keeping an eye on a production's financial situation can keep the production running.

As discussed in Part I of this series, a production usually pays the theatre a flat weekly rent, a "package fee" that covers the salaries of box office and house staff as well as administrative costs, and a percentage of the Gross Weekly Box Office Receipts ("GWBOR") above the show's weekly "break even" point (the show's fixed weekly operating costs). One of the first things a general manager does on a production is negotiate and draft this agreement, along with the producers and their legal counsel. The general manager's quest to keep production costs down can begin here. If the general manager is negotiating a license with a theatre owner who is highly motivated to get a quality production into his or her theatre, the general manager may negotiate a relatively low rent in exchange for giving the theatre a higher percentage each week after the "break even." As an example, Albert recalled when he licensed Shubert theatres on Broadway for As Is and the Steppenwolf Theatre Company's production of The Grapes of Wrath. "The Shuberts" (Gerald Schoenfeld and the late Bernard Jacobs) knew that these were prestige productions of quality plays that nevertheless might need time to find an audience. Therefore, as they had a close relationship, Albert was able to negotiate very low rents in exchange for a higher percentage of any box office gross above the weekly "break even." In general, however, Albert warned, Broadway is more financially oriented than off-Broadway, and all of the contracts more complex due to the more complex union regulations.

It is also important to get your production off to a good start by choosing the right time to open. Most Broadway shows prefer the spring so they can use the June Tony Award as a springboard. In general, Albert said, fall is a better time to open a drama, and spring a better time to open comedies and musicals. This is primarily because the tourists that come to New York in the late spring and summer tend to buy tickets to shows that promise lighter entertainment. As far as critical reception is concerned, critics are in a more casual mode in the early summer, after the spring shows have opened, and are more likely to be sympathetic in their reviews of new works. They are also more sympathetic to a show that catches their attention in a small or institutional venue, because they enjoy the satisfaction that comes with "discovering" a new work or quality revival. As a general rule, Albert pointed out, it is not wise to open a production between Thanksgiving and the middle of January, when theatregoers' minds are on the holidays. Also avoid opening between the end of June and Labor Day, because the press is dispersed and many important critics are away.

Finally, we discussed the recent trend of opening shows in non-traditional venues, such as Hedwig and the Angry Inch at the new Jane Street Theatre, which is a converted ballroom. Albert said he would always be open to new and off-the-beaten-track venues if they were right for the production, but would not approach the idea "with optimism." Any space used to present a show would need to be brought up to safety and fire codes, which can be very expensive (in the case of Hedwig, the renovation cost $100,000). In addition, it is always difficult to convince audiences to go to an out-of-the-way neighborhood to see a production. The Roundabout is presenting its new production of Cabaret at the "Kit Kat Club," which at one time was the Henry Miller Theatre but has not been used as a theatre for quite some time. However, it is on West 43rd Street, only a half block from most of the major Broadway theatres. The show has now moved to Studio 54 the site of the famed disco.

In general, the cost of producing a show and keeping it running is rising quickly. In his own research, Albert recently discovered that while the cost of living has gone up 50% over the past 17 years (the number of years he has been producing and general managing), the cost of advertising in The New York Times has gone up 637%. The moral of the story is to find a diligent, knowledgeable general manager for your production who will be your general in your battle of the budget. That battle begins with the author and director and then the negotiation of a theatre license that allows your production to minimize its expenses, while at the same time allowing everyone who took a risk at the beginning to reap the rewards if the show is a success.

That's Show Biz.
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Bruce J. Lazarus, Editor of Broadway University News, is an entertainment attorney in New York City providing counsel in business transactions and finance for the theatre, film, and music industries. He is the former Director of Business and Legal Affairs for Walt Disney Motion Pictures and Television, Inc. and Walt Disney Theatrical Productions Ltd., responsible for KING DAVID, THE LION KING, AIDA and the international companies of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. He recently produced the off-Broadway play SHAKESPEARE'S R&J (Winner 1998 Lucile Lortel Award) and the feature film "INTERUPTIONS," which is currently on the festival circuit.

For a FREE consultation regarding legal representation Bruce Lazarus can be reached by telephone: 212.333.7000 (ext. 15), FAX:212.208.3059 or by e- mail: Bruce@BroadwayUniversity.com

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Editor: Bruce Lazarus
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